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Home > Relieve > Autism
Autism study

Neurofeedback has a 90% success rate and produces a 42% reduction in autism symptoms, compared with controls.

Dr. Rob Coben's 2006 presentation abstract on his research with Autism.

This presentation will focus on empirical data and a theoretical framework from which to understand Neurofeedback interventions for Autistic Spectrum Disorder. Our research evaluated the efficacy of assessment (QEEG)-guided neurofeedback for children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Findings included a 92% success rate with a 41.57% reduction in Autistic symptoms, which was significantly different than a wait-list control group. Neurophysiological changes included increased metabolic flow to frontal cortices and movement towards normalized QEEG connectivity. A theoretical approach for treatment of ASD focusing on aspects of EEG connectivity will be presented.

Details:

Plenary #42):  Neurofeedback For Autism: Empirical Validation and Theoretical Framework

Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) consists of a spectrum of heterogeneous disorders
including Autism, Aspergers Disorder, Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not
Otherwise Specified, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder, and Retts Disorder. The
heterogeneity of ASD makes it more complex to treat effectively. The prevalence of
ASD is as high as 60 per 10,000 or 1 in 166 children (Medical Research Council, 2001).

Current research suggests ASD may be associated with functional disconnectivity
between brain regions (Courchesne & Pierce, 2005; Belmonte et al., 2004; Baron-Cohen, 2004). Therefore, connectivity between the frontal cortex and other brain regions may be unsynchronized, weakly responsive, and information impoverished (Courchesne & Pierce, 2005). Quantitative EEG (QEEG) analysis can precisely pinpoint patterns of  disconnectivity among brain regions in children with ASD. ASD can best be conceived of as a neurodevelopmental disorder. Therefore, interventions which can activate affected neural pathways can normalize function and result in improved treatment outcomes.

This presentation will focus on empirical data and a theoretical framework from which to understand neurofeedback interventions for Autistic Spectrum Disorder. Our research evaluated the efficacy of assessment (QEEG)-guided neurofeedback for children with ASD. Findings included a 92% success rate with a 41.57% reduction in Autistic symptoms, which was significantly different than a wait-list control group. This was accomplished after only 20 Neurofeedback sessions done twice per week.

Neurophysiological changes included increased metabolic flow to frontal cortices and movement towards normalized QEEG connectivity. A theoretical approach for the treatment of ASD focusing on aspects of EEG connectivity will be presented. There is reason to believe that the greatest EEG anomaly in Autistic persons in a combination of hyper- and hypoconnectivity interfering with adequate brain functioning. 

From:
http://www.brainmeeting.com/maxspeakers/reports/speaker29.html


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